Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Bereans vs. Pharisees

“Now the Berean Jews were of more noble character than those in Thessalonica, for they received the message with great eagerness and examined the Scriptures every day to see if what Paul said was true” Acts 17:11 (NIV).

How do you spell Pharisee: pompous, haughty, arrogant, rude, ingratiating, sarcastic, educated, egotistical, snob? It's unfair to paint them all with that broad brush, but many that Jesus tangled with fell into this category. The largely uneducated Jewish population were under the tutelage of these religious teachers of the law. Unlike us, the Jews had no other options. We can at least change churches.

Mark Virkler described the difference between a Pharisee and a Berean. Pharisees look to prove someone wrong; Bereans look to prove them right. What would happen if Christians as a whole took a more Berean approach toward those who threaten to tip over their personal sacred cows? Would this methodology put us in a better frame of mind to investigate challenges to our belief systems? It might.

To entertain the remote possibility that you just might be wrong can be grounds for serious heartburn and possible excommunication (just kidding...maybe not). If our foundation's not as firm as believed isn't it better to adjust as opposed to pretending our concrete footers aren't grounded in quicksand?

To clarify, there are basic non-negotiable tenets of the faith. These aren't the issues I'm talking about (although some may disagree). We all have our pet doctrines. As I look back over forty plus years of being a Christian I've revised my position on subjects I once thought were indisputable. That said, in the coming years I'll probably make even more changes as I grow in the knowledge of how ignorant I really am about God.

I've come to accept that God is so much bigger and complex than my personal theology can handle or even dream up. Daily I'm reminded how small my understanding is. He constantly challenges my shallow thinking and I've become more comfortable not being a know it all. I get lots of opportunities to grow and prove myself wrong.

If I chose to explore a different idea as opposed to defending my own (and of course correct) position, my study habits change. Rather than search for arguments to bolster my case, with fresh eyes I can look for and find things I've missed. I may come to the conclusion that my original premise is sound and intact. My attitude, however, will be very different. I can ditch the haughty I-told-you-so demeanor and experience the let down that comes when you root for the underdog who doesn't pull a “Rudy” off in the final seconds of the game. If you don't know who Rudy was, Google him. Hint: he played Notre Dame football. My heart has changed. There are no longer any quacks or adversaries, just those I agree to disagree with. No corresponding feelings of superiority are needed.

The world and the church could use a lot more Bereans and a whole lot less Pharisees. Do you think the pre-Christians would take note if we didn't name call and fight over incidentals? What if we sat down and investigated conflicting claims in an effort to prove the other guy right? Think that might garner some attention? Much of what we come to blows over has nothing to do with the key issue – salvation through Christ alone.

How about you? Has someone yanked your doctrinal chain? If so, will you react as a Berean or a Pharisee?

Photo from Google Images

2 comments:

  1. Mary:
    I like this. It gives me things to ponder. I especially like the acrostic you made from the name pharisees. Blessings to you and yours.

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    1. I am sending this link to some friends.

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